Video Editing terms

Over-the-shoulder

A shot taken from behind a person's shoulder, typically during a conversation.

What is an over-the-shoulder in video editing?

Over-the-shoulder is a technique used in video editing and cinematography that involves framing the shot from a perspective over the shoulder of one of the characters. This technique is often used in dialogue scenes to show the interaction between two characters, with one character's back and shoulder in the foreground, and the other character, who is facing and interacting with the first character, in the middle or background of the shot.

The over-the-shoulder shot is a powerful tool in visual storytelling as it helps to establish the spatial relationship between the characters and their environment. It also allows the audience to see the reactions and expressions of the character in the background, enhancing the emotional depth and realism of the scene. This technique is commonly used in various types of visual media, including films, television shows, and video games.

How is over-the-shoulder shot used in video editing?

Over-the-shoulder shot is a filming technique used in video editing to create a sense of depth and perspective in a scene. It involves positioning the camera behind a subject so that the viewer sees the scene from the subject's perspective, with a portion of the subject's shoulder and back in the foreground. This technique is often used in dialogue scenes to show the interaction between two characters, allowing the viewer to see the facial expressions and reactions of the character being spoken to.

The over-the-shoulder shot is a powerful tool in video editing as it helps to establish a connection between the characters and the audience. It provides a sense of intimacy and involvement, making the viewer feel as if they are part of the conversation. It also helps to guide the viewer's focus towards the main subject of the scene. This technique is commonly used in various types of visual storytelling including films, television shows, and video games.

What is the purpose of an over-the-shoulder shot in film editing?

The purpose of an over-the-shoulder shot in film editing is to create a sense of depth and perspective in a scene, and to establish a connection between two characters. This type of shot is typically used in dialogue scenes to show the interaction between the characters from a third-person perspective. It involves framing the shot from behind one character, focusing on the other character they are interacting with, while keeping part of the first character's shoulder or the back of their head in the frame.

The over-the-shoulder shot is a powerful tool in visual storytelling as it helps to convey the emotional dynamics between the characters. It allows the audience to see the reactions and expressions of the character being focused on, while also reminding them of the presence and perspective of the other character. This technique can also be used to create tension or anticipation, as the audience is limited to the viewpoint of the character whose shoulder is in the frame.

What are some tips for effectively using over-the-shoulder shots in video editing?

Over-the-shoulder shots are a powerful tool in video editing, often used to establish a conversation or interaction between two characters. To effectively use this technique, it's important to maintain the rule of 180 degrees. This rule states that two characters in a scene should maintain the same left/right relationship to one another. If this rule is broken, it can confuse the viewer about the spatial relationship between the characters.

Another tip is to ensure that the shoulder in the foreground is out of focus, drawing the viewer's attention to the character in the background. This can be achieved by using a shallow depth of field. Also, remember to balance the shot. If the character in the foreground is on the left side of the frame, the character in the background should be on the right side. This creates a balanced, aesthetically pleasing shot. Lastly, consider the eyeline of the characters. The character in the background should be looking directly at the character in the foreground to maintain the illusion of direct conversation.

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Tella — Screen recording for creators

Tella — Screen recording for creators